Tech Talk Episode 2: The Hour of Code

 

In this special edition of Tech Talk we cover the Hour of Code event hosted by the Coding Club. The event is designed to introduce novices to the world of Computer Science.
The Hour of Code is organized by Code.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to expanding computer science participation within schools. Companies such as Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, the Girls Clubs of America, and the College Board have all come out in support for Code.org’s Hour of Code. According to Code.org the purpose of the Hour of Code is, “to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics.”

When someone is asked about computer programming they will most probably respond that it is very complicated and difficult, Code.org is attempting to disprove this common misconception. “The simplicity of the Hour of Code really gave experienced coders and beginners equal opportunity to have fun and cooperate,” remarked Chris Perez after completing the Hour of Code. This simplicity is the key to Code.org’s success with this event. The mistake some organizations make when they create a programming tutorial series is that they aim it people who already grasp the basics of programming and what it does. Code.org recognized this so they created a tutorial program aimed as a precursor to other online coding tutorials. On the official website it even states that the Hour of Code can be completed by anyone from the ages of 4 to 104.
The beauty of Hour of Code is that it isn’t restricted by time or place. There is no one day of the year in a conference hall in California, the Hour of Code can be completed by anyone at anytime from anywhere in the world. Over 180+ countries have had Hour of Code events hosted within their borders and the tutorials are offered in over 30 languages.
What most don’t realize is that a simple tutorial such as the Hour of Code can introduce students to a whole new world. Programming teaches students basic logic, critical thinking, and problem solving. “Learning programming is an amazing skill,” said Chris Modrono the Vice President of the Coding Club, “being able to program is a valuable asset no matter what field you go into.”

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